Farmhouse Industrial Laundry Room Renovation Round-Up

Y’all – we have moved beyond the paint brush. Call it our inaugural home renovation, but we’ve moved on to mortar and tile and whew – it feels good (like I knew that it woullllddd). It also felt tiring and hard and smelt like sweaty arm pits. But hey – it’s done! Well, actually, it’s started. ūüėČ We officially have a farmhouse industrial laundry room happening and it makes me oh so happy!

As a reminder, here is our mood board inspiration for our farmhouse inspired laundry room renovation. Simple, and industrial chic.

Laundry Room Mood Board

I’m waiting for a mega sale on the washer/dryer combo and unfortunately just missed the Memorial Day sale spritz, so I think I’ll have to hold off until Labor Day (boo!!!). I’ve got my eye on this LG beauty and I’m not will to pay over $899 each (which is what they were Memorial Day weekend), so I sit, and I wait to add these cherries to my farmhouse laundry room renovation, le sigh.

We’ve certainly made some progress since you last saw our laundry room, like this. What a lovely shade of green…

Laundry Room Closet Renovation

After some back-breaking hours of work, we now have this! Mmmm charcoal gray grout and some hubba hubba subway tile. My fav. I love the industrial vibe it gives in the space.

Charcoal Gray Grout Subway Tile

We decided to go with a dark charcoal wall, to tie in with the grout and the flooring. I can’t wait to accessorize¬†the walls with¬†some art, and storage! Ignore the sloppy edge on the tile, we haven’t caulked yet, so you can see the inconsistencies. Since we knew this wall would be mostly covered by a washer and dryer and shelves, we definitely were in power through and get it done mode vs. absolute perfection mode. Plus, I’ve learned over time that if there are hacks to make your life easier (i.e a line of caulk – use it!)

Charcoal Gray Paint Behr

Our general process for the farmhouse industrial laundry room renovation was to paint the walls and remove the washer/dryer the night before. For $10 we rented an appliance dolly from U-haul and it literally took us 15 minutes to move these (heavy!) appliances. For those that have been reading the blog for a while – you’ll remember our last washer/dryer moving experience did not go quite as well. Loorrrrrrdddieee.

We stored them in H’s room while we renovated. He thought that was pretty sweet. ūüėÄ New toys!

Renting Appliance Dolly Cost

Then, the next morning (after demo) we started by laying the subway tiles. In general, our philosophy with this reno is that 95% of the tile (especially the bottom third) would be covered up with storage and/or our washer and dryer, so although we wanted it to look rockin’ we mostly wanted it to be done. We worked very quickly on this tile and we were definitely not as meticulous as past kitchen installs where everything is visible all. the. time.

Subway Tile in Laundry Room

Then, after the wall tile was up, we started in on the floor tile. I wanted a slate tile for the farmhouse laundry room renovation, but the local hardware stores only had this porcelain option in stock. It looks just like slate and was only $2.29 a square foot. I’ll call that a win. We had a very small area to tile, so this portion of the project cost us less than $50.

We just centered the first tile and worked from there.

Slate Floor Tile Porcelian

We actually didn’t install a threshold, and put the grout line right up to the wood floor. They didn’t have a matching threshold in stock, so we just worked with what we had and winged it a bit. I think it looks really good though!

Slate Floor Tile

Sans our appliances and shelving, this is how the room looks now. In the interest of preserving our sanity, we’re going to tackle the shelving another day. Super excited to bust that project out … coming soon!

Subway Tile Slate Floor Laundry

Tip Top Shape

You know how something can be mostly done around your house, and although that final 3% makes you want to rip your hair out, you kinda just grind your teeth every time you walk by it and say that you’ll take care of it next week? Yeah … story of my life around this house right here.

So our kitchen has been mostly done for a while. We’ve actually been waiting MONTHS for Home Depot to come by and finish a few small details – they’re actually scheduled to come by today – so fingers crossed, they will actually be done after oh, 6-months of waiting. ūüėČ That saga warrants another post, y’all, it’s been crazy town with those silly kids.¬†I think because we knew they still had to come through and finish their portion, we kept on holding off on simple things we needed to do. Things like the crown and caulking and backsplash touching up. But you know what, This weekend, we grabbed that kitchen by the horns and just did it.

This is what our kitchen looked like sans crown. Almost there, but not quite.

Subway Tile Backsplash

After last weekend, we now have this!

Adding Crown in Kitchen

Boom chicka lacka lacka – BOOM. No kidding folks, this lady likes, eer loves her crown.

So after some heartfelt pleas from Jay bird, we decided to go with smaller, more manageable crown than the last joint. Added bonus, it was actually sitting in our garage from our last crown install in the house, so it was kinda a no brainer to use it up.

Before we could add the crown, we had to put in a header piece (just like the last house) so it had something to affix to.

Header for Cabinet Crown

Since we wanted to give this a second to cure, we actually cut and glued these pieces on with liquid nails the evening before.

Normally, a section of this header would be showing, but when we got started in on this little project, we realized that our ceilings are so dang not straight that we had to sorta nix the original plan.

How to Install Crown on Kitchen Cabinets The second crown install option above is what we thought we’d be doing, and in reality, we landed up having to do the first. Totally fine, not a big deal. I personally think the second one looks a bit more regal (extra height, more dimensional) but in the end, I’m just super happy to have to crown up and installed. Gotta work with what you got in old houses. ūüėČ

We also realized during our installation process that we had forgotten to add the top row of subway tiles back in the day. Not sure what happened there, but past self was definitely not looking out for future self.

Side note – notice the spot on the ceiling where there’s a curve – that’s where our old cabinets use to end! B-b-b-onus for way more cabinet space.

Subway Tile Above Range

All and all, it was a pretty quick project. After deciding to nix the visible base piece, we just had 10 cuts or so and this baby was done.

Adding Crown to Top of Cabinets

Here’s a close up shot of the crown up above the fridge cabinet. It still needs some paint touch up on the nail holes but man, does it look better. Oh my, why or why did we wait so long to bust this sucker out?

Adding Crown to Cabinets

Have you ever added crown to the top of your cabinets? How did it go?

A Nurse and a Nerd | Guest Blogger!

You guys are in for a treat today! Laura over at A Nurse and A Nerd is telling all y’all about her a-mazing kitchen reno. It’s quite the before and after! Here’s Laura, to give you the deets!

Hi there everyone!

My name is Laura!  I blog on a little place on the web called A Nurse and A Nerd.  I work as a nurse by night and a home renovator/blogger by day.

Back in May of 2013, my husband and I bought this.

Our circa 1975 cape cod that was screaming to be loved… and demolished. So we started out with a huge Phase 1 renovation that took us down to the studs and back again.¬† Why would we do such a thing?¬† Well because we are crazy!… and because this house was perfectly situated with a panoramic view of the river and directly next to my family’s apple orchard and farm.¬† It’s been an adventure to say the least, but after 6 months of renovations we moved in and have been settling in for the past 7 months.

Mary was kind enough to invite me over here to Lemon Grove to share with you our kitchen renovation.

Here is the kitchen on the day we closed on our home.

Let’s go on a 360 tour – clockwise.

It was a bit dark and a bit dingy Рwith a great big layer of grease all over everything to top it all off.  Not really our style.

So we gutted everything.  And knocked down the walls that were closing in the kitchen.

We removed the exterior door, the soffit, the linoleum and all the drywall.

And now?¬† Well I’d say we’ve made a least a mild improvement.

I’m a simple, timeless, country cottage kind of girl.¬† So that’s what we went for.¬† White inset perimeter cabinets.¬† Black beadboard island.

On the island we used a white quartz that has a cararra marble look.  Its called Bianco Carrara Quartz.

And on the parameter we used a granite called Silver Wave.¬† I love that it grounds the white cabinets.¬† Plus the busy pattern hides a lot of messes while I’m baking cookies for my cookie monster husband.

I love the timeless simplicity of subway tile, so that is what we used as the backsplash – not to mention I found the tile for about $20 total at the Habitat ReStore!

The farmhouse sink is Kohler.¬†It’s super special to me.¬† You can read about that here.

One of the other favorite parts of my kitchen are my copper lights.  They just are the icing to my cake.  The cherry on top.  The chocolate syrup on my sundae.   

Newsflash: I like sweets.…And I also like my copper lights.

The counter stools are IKEA. And I love how they pop next to the black island.

We absolutely love our kitchen.¬† The biggest thing we love about it?¬† The openness. The opportunity to entertain and be in on the action. We’re big extroverts.¬† So the idea of keeping everything open and flowing was our #1 priority in our kitchen renovation.

We just finished painting and sprucing up our living room and currently have our eyes on the bedroom.  I hope you stop by and see the progress we make!

Thanks again to Mary for inviting me over and thanks to you all for taking a tour around!

Can You Say Kitchen?

I like to eat, a lot. Therefore I like kitchens, a lot. I also like kitchens since designing one, in my book, is a barrel of monkeys worth of fun. Sit me down with some graph paper and images of pinterest kitchens dancing in my head, I’ll have a layout down on paper in no time flat. I like designing a kitchen space in concept, but the long and short of it, is that when reality wakes you up from your dreaming and scheming you realize that kitchens cost ya top dollar my friend. With our last house’s renovation still fresh in my head, I’ve got a pretty good idea of what this next kitchen will set us back. That being said, there are some wrinkles and differences between the two houses, so we’ll have to see how the cookie crumbles at the end of the day.

We’re not quite to the price everything out phase yet (although we do know what our general budget will be), so I thought I’d start with the fun stuff first – i.e. the design for the space! ūüėÄ

This is what our kitchen looks like right now – from this angle – pretty vintage chic cute, right?

1940's White Kitchen

Upon closer inspection, there are a few issues though. Like this cabinet. It’s so close to the dishwasher that it actually doesn’t even open. #fail

Cabinets_That_Dont_Open

Or the bundle of cabinet doors that don’t actually shut. All the doors are super tricky to open, too. You need an on demand Popeye hoisting the door open to¬†grab¬†your cereal spoon each morning. Fo realz.

Cabinets_That_Wont_Shut

When you’re actually able to get the cabinets open, it looks more like a rustic lodge camping kitchen, than the tres chic look I’m going for ūüėÄ

Dated_Cabinet_Interior

In all honesty, I’m pretty bummed that we’re not able to salvage the cabinets. When our realtor sent us the MLS listing she mentioned that the kitchen would need a complete gut and when I looked at the pictures I was all naaahhhh – I can work with that! But once we actually got into the house to see things up close, I could definitely tell where she was coming from. Although I love the traditional style (and I’ll definitely recreate the white shaker look when we start the reno), the kitchen as it is just really does not function.

We are going to try to be really careful when we remove them, so that we can find another home for them via craigslist, or perhaps for a workbench area in the basement. That being said, when we were looking at them up close last night, it’s hard to even tell if these are boxes (where you can unscrew them, and remove them) or if the cabinets are actually built right onto the wall.

The upside of our catastrophe of a kitchen, is that we’ll get to renovate it! After this vintage ensemble, I can tell you it’s going to feel a-mazinge to have all updated digs (soft close doors! Crisp and new!) As of right now, this is the general direction I think I’ll be going in for kitchen reno 2.0.

Kitchen Mood Board

 

If you were around for the last kitchen renovation last summer, you’ll definitely see a lot of the same finishes. What can I say – we liked it, and it worked! We’ll probably tweak things here and there, but for the most part, it’s going to have the same look and feel as the last house.

Although I really liked how things turned out last time, I do look forward to adding some subtle accents in, to keep everything from feeling too stark and white.

One of our all time favorite things about our last kitchen renovation, was the HUGE impact we had from taking out the wall between our tiny dining room and our tiny kitchen. Since we were amazed with how much this small change opened up the room and the flow of the space, we’re doing the exact same thing in this house. Yep, that walls down and things are looking so. much. better. in there! We’re still cleaning the room up a bit post demo, but I’m so excited to show y’all how things are looking tomorrow.

For reference, when we moved in this was the general layout for the kitchen/dining room space.

Changing Kitchen Layout

On the left side wall of the kitchen, the only thing that was positioned there when we bought the house was the fridge. In a smaller sized kitchen (11’6″ x 10′) – that is a just a waste of space! With the door opening location though, it was really the only thing you could put on that wall and not restrict traffic flow through the room. Here is a shot of that kitchen wall, as it looked on move-in day. Definitely not optimizing the space!

Removing Wall

Since we’re removing a wall, our game plan is to reconfigure¬†that area with a much more functional peninsula, which will have our dishwasher and sink on it. We wanted to avoid the pitfalls of the current kitchen, where the only spot the dishwasher fit meant that you had a cabinet drawer that didn’t open …

Removing Wall Between Kitchen and Dining Room

The layout above is what we’re hoping to go for when we reinstall the cabinets. I’m super excited about adding this peninsula and think it will be great to have the sink and dishwasher loading area facing out toward the dining room, which allows you to chat with guests even if you’re rinsing off dishes.

Now, let me tell you, since we’ve always owned and renovated older homes, I literally never thought we’d have a house large enough to accommodate any type of island, so I’m so excited about putting together some ideas for this one. Here’s a basic sketch of what I think the peninsula will look like once we’re finished with it.

Custom Kitchen Island Plenty of room for storage, including a little built-in nook for our microwave to keep the counters clutter free! Squeeee!! (I think you can add that to my never thought I’d ever have this feature in my kitchen list, too!) ūüėČ

Overall, we’re so excited about the transformations we have planned for this space. I’m pretty sure that once it’s done, it will be my favorite space in the house! Has anyone else undertaken a kitchen renovation lately? Any words of advice as we embark on this new adventure?

 

My Love Hate Relationship with Herringbone Tile: Part II

So, yesterday we showed you some of the play by play shots of this whole bathroom remodel delio, but for those that want to try tackling herringbone themselves, I thought a wee little tutorial might be in order. Overall – I’d say it’s an 8 on the toughness scale, but by George, it’s a beaut when your done with it!

When I’m starting any project around the house, pinterest is usually the first stop. Lots of inspiration, and often, actually helpful stuff! We found this amazing tutorial on pinterest, and I whole¬†heartily¬†encourage it’s use. Here is a picture from the tutorial that sums up your basic first cuts that will set the stage for the rest of the pattern.

How to install herringbone tile
Herringbone Tile Pattern

So per the recommendations, we got a Speed Square and got to workin’! Overall, these are the tools of the trade that we used for the herringbone cut on the tile:

  1. Speed Square $10
  2. Pencil (cheap!) ūüėČ
  3. Ryobi Tile Saw ($150,  we have this one)
  4. 40 square feet of subway tile $64.00
  5. Mortar $14.37
  6. Grout $9.88
Supplies for tile installation
The Goods

It took a few cuts to get the hang of this whole triangle cutting process, and there were a few tile¬†casualties¬†along the way. That being said, subway tiles are .22 each, so it’s not the END of the world if you¬†nick¬†a few up. ¬†I told Jay he was lucky we¬†weren’t¬†doing marble tiles! ūüėČ First, we measured out the triangle with the speed square, to cut off the edge.

How to Cut Herringbone Tile
How to Cut Herringbone Tile

Things we realized along the way. You pretty much have to do this cut free hand. We tried using a guide that the tile saw has on it, but it actually landed up creating more issues, with the tiles getting all jagged, and inconsistent on the edges. Here is the line up of the first few that got added to the scrap pile.

How to cut herringbone tile
The Land of Misfit Tiles

Many of these were useful later on down the road, but with their clipped corners and uneven edges, we had to put them on the shelf for later use. As we continued to move across the wall, additional cuts were needed. Once the tile was placed up on the wall, we just used a pencil to mark both where the start of the tile should be, and where the tile should end with the grout line. This helped us to make sure we had a really good guide for the exact line to cut once we had it up on the tile saw.

Installing subway tile
Making the Cut

After you have carefully measured and marked your tile, just line that baby up with the blade and let er’ rip! I practically closed my eyes for this part each time (note – I was NOT cutting), since it made my arm pits a bit sweaty to see Jay’s hand that close to a quickly moving, sharp blade. Happy to say we made it through the bathroom remodel with all fingers intact. :)

How to cute subway tile
Cutting the Tile

Jay and I had high hopes of busting this tiling job out in a weekend, and let’s just say it took more like a 2-weeks + ūüėČ Namely, since once the weekend is over, we just have evenings to work on it, so the schedule gets pushed back quite a bit. Overall, it definitely took extra time, extra patience and extra energy (I may, or may not have actually DONE all these things, ahem, patience) to do the herringbone tile, but it was SO worth it in my opinion!

Herringbone Subway Tile
Bathroom | After

I feel like my bathroom tile is a work of art now. Like a¬†Louvre exhibit. That is either highly insulting to Rembrandt, or highly complementary to my hubby’s handiwork ūüėȬ†Here is a snapshot of how it looks all up, sans grout. I’m just so stinking happy it’s done. That mother was a beast! Check out the little niche we built-in for storage. I’ll have a post with the play by play on that soon.

Herringbone Subway Tile
Bathroom | After

And a final shot of the whole shabang. Yes, one tile popped out along the bottom. Jay will pop it back in, soon. :)

Subway Tile Herringbone Pattern
Bathroom | After

Now all we have left to do in this room is:

  • Paint
  • Install the new floor
  • Install the trim
  • Grout the tiles
  • Install the new built-in shelf
  • Install new lighting
  • Install new sink


My Love Hate Relationship with Herringbone Tile

Oye. This one was been a doozy. Yeah, I know, I’m¬†supposed¬†to say how easy this is, and that all you have to do is pick up a trowel and you’ll be well on your way to the chicest bathroom known to man. At least that was what I was envisioning when we started this project. Turns out, there were a few more twists and turns along the way ūüėČ After 12 straight hours of slaving away, this is what we had to show for the tile laying portion of the project. It moved SLOW. Slow as¬†molasses.

Herringbone Subway Tile Install
Herringbone Subway Tile Install

After doing lots of measuring and using the level to make sure we were marking the lines correctly, we decided to start the pattern right in the middle of the tub¬†surround, just seemed like the best place to start. That being said, this did land up requiring a lot more cuts than we had with the conventional, brick laid subway tile, and you are less likely to be able to use the scraps, more on that later. The red line up the middle marked the very center of the tub, which helped us keep the pattern centered. The horizontal line was to keep everything level. In theory … ūüėČ

How to install herringbone subway tile
First Tile!

In addition to putting one line up the side for the border tile, we also used the level to put a line all the way around the tub surround to make sure that the pattern was staying at a consistent height throughout. We did this namely after realizing that our tub was in no way level (lovely) so we quickly realized we would not be able to use it as a guide.

How to install subway tile
Creating a Level Line

On our first house, we had laid down subway tile in the conventional pattern, like brick laying, example here. Very basic. Quite straight forward. I wanted to up the style factor a notch in this bathroom and do a herringbone tile, and although I knew it would be harder than the basic pattern we utilized last time, I thought it wouldn’t take quite so long. For starters, I knew that we did a few things considerably more correct this time around with some of the prep work (referenced here and here), so in all honesty, I thought that would eliminate some of the issues we bumped into this time around. Probably our MOST¬†noticeable¬†boo boo came in the form of a hacked off tile. Since Jay didn’t work straight across, but rather started at the bottom, and had tiles creeping in from both sides, we found that when we went to place one row of tiles, it just didn’t fit. Yikes! Case and point below:

How to install subway tile
A Case of the Misfit Tile

Ummm, yeah. That wasn’t good. After putting our heads together on it (ok, it wasn’t THAT calm, he he) we decided to just let er’ be. With the way this pattern is laid, it was really hard to tell that there was a difference in tile size, unless you took a measuring tape up to it. Jay kept telling me – look – it’s just like an optical illusion, no one will ever notice! ūüėČ At this point, we were just willing to accept that some things wouldn’t be perfect. After this case of the mis-fit tile(s) we were definitely EXTRA¬†diligent¬†to check every.single.row to make sure it was level on all accounts, since we wanted to avoid reliving that whole kit and kaboodle, if possible.

How to remove mortar from tile lines
Mortar Time

Another lesson learned the first time around is to not to put too much mortar on the back of the tile, since it will seep out and cause issues with your grout. Last time, there were little bumps up in the grout lines, were you could see dried mortar through the grout. This looks really bad in my opinion  so we made a hard core effort to minimize excess mortar this time around.

I’ll be back tomorrow with the play by play on how to¬†actually¬†DO the herringbone tile installation (cuts, etc) and some AFTER pictures! :)