Cool Cat Kitchen

Since yesterday’s post on the herringbone tile installation was so dang long, I thought I’d saved the tantalizing reveal for today 😉 Without a doubt, hands down, this kitchen is already functioning so much better than the last one. In all honesty, it really isn’t that much bigger (we gained 6″ on each side of the cabinetry) but it feels so much bigger. We actually have a cabinet or two that are empty right now. Whaaa?? I never thought I’d be saying those words. Holla.

As far as details go, there are so many things I absolutely love about this space, so it’s really hard for me to pick a favorite. A long time back, I spotted a herringbone tile pattern on a kitchen that was done by Urban Grace Interiors. Seriously, everything this design firm does is absolutely amazing. I remember storing that one in the memory bank for our next house. I think it’s what started my whole herringbone obsession, actually. 😉 I’m so glad I saw that picture, because I think every subsequent house may need this back splash. I LOVE it.

Herringbone Subway Tile

Other than being a total pain in the tuckus to put up, this backsplash totally makes the space for me. Best part, herringbone tiles cost all of .22 each. Yep, that is cheap. So the total out of pocket cost was under $40. Yippity doo freaking dah.

Here is our problem area from before, after the grout is in. Although I still think its a bit noticeable, overall the white grout really helped to mask the issue and make it way less obvious. White on white for the win.

Herringbone Subway Tile

As far as the ergonomics of the space, I’d give it a 9.6 out of 10. The last kitchen, hmm, closer to a 7. Taking out a wall obviously made a huge difference in the overall flow of the space, and notably, it allowed us to add larger cabinetry that stores more of our day to day kitchen essentials. For instance, when we were first planning out the kitchen layout (with the wall in) we were looking at two 12″ lower cabinets. That is teeny tiny. Almost comical, actually. Now we’ve got two hefty 18″ cabinets flanking the oven, which has been more than ample storage for our cooking and dry food needs.

DIY Herringbone Backsplash

On the storage front, I knew I wanted to have a nice tall, counter mounted cabinet that would enable us to take advantage of that usual dead space in the corner. And not only does this guy meet the storage bill, he’s also quite the handsome little stud muffin, too. He’ll look even better once I give him some crown on top.

Tall Cabinet on Counter

The dining room flows right into the kitchen as well, so it’s nice to have that added space where I can hang out with Jay in the evening while he cooks dinner. (Best husband ever, right?) Long term, if we ever opt to convert the screened in porch to a more formal dining space, I’d probably make this space to a loungy couch area vs. more cabinetry, since I absolutely love having that low key, conversational aspect to our kitchen.

White Shaker Kitchen Cabinets

The room is still pretty small as far as modern kitchens go (10×10), but I’m totally fine with that, especially since it opens up to the adjacent 10×9 dining room. I vastly prefer a small, functional space, to one that is a bit more sprawled out. I think the key word is functional though, since a tiny space that doesn’t have enough room for your kitchen essentials is pretty obnoxious, too. Coming in from the side door entrance, you can definitely still tell it’s a smaller room, but since it’s open to the dining space now, everything feels more open and airy.

White Kitchen With Quartz Counters

For old time’s sake, lets take a look at the same view before. Wall in the way, and no frenchie french doors, either.

Taking Down Kitchen Wall

Since I’m all about breaking down the numbers, here is an overview of what we spent on the kitchen. This is by far the most we’ve ever spent on a home renovation project, but in all honesty, I’m so happy to have such a nice, new kitchen now, that the money feels well worth it in the end. This kitchen was also a bit of a departure for us, since we are used to doing everything single detail ourselves. Since the installation was basically free though (they take off the sales tax at Lowes if you use their installers), it really didn’t make sense for us to install them and have a totally lackluster finished product.

We did try to compensate for those extra expenses by doing the things we knew we could do ourselves, like the backsplash, and later down the line the crown. A penny saved, is a dollar earned, right Benny Franklin. Seriously, where did he come up with all those fine witty sayings. Love that founding father o’ mine.

Alright, y’all ready for this? Here’s the lay of the land.

  • New Gas Line: $250
  • New Appliances: $6,041 – $750 rebate = $5,291 (DAGGER, Dagger to the heart)
  • Diamond Cabinetry: $5,018 – $565 rebate = $4,453 (Yeah, I think that’s another dagger right there)
  • Counters: $2,050 ($71 per square foot)
  • Sink: Free!
  • Faucet: $220
  • Hardware: $45
  • Herringbone Tile Installation $39

Total out of pocket: $9,998 – (After sale of our appliances and old kitchen and rebates)

We got $1,500 for the counters and cabinets, and $850 for all the old appliances and racked up $1,315 in cash rebates. All in all, we had a total savings of $3,665 from craigslisting our old stuff, and submitting rebates. Malcolm approves.

Malcolm the Cat

Psst – want to see how the kitchen turned out after the crown install? Get the deets here. :)

 

 

 

Kitchen Reno | The Lay of the Land

Ah, the kitchen reno. It’s a love/hate relationship. At this point, I would say we are 10% into the process, which is enough to feel very daunted and enough to feel rather poor by the oncoming onslaught of bills about to come your way 😉 You think you budget in every detail, and then…

In order to get a good idea of the lay of the land with cabinetry and counters, we have been shopping around quite a bit. First stop was Lowes. Mainly, because I saw this kitchen via Young House Love (actually a reader re-design from Design Me Gilla) and knew that I had to at least price these babies out and see how the cards stacked to determine if they were within our price range. We are going for all white cabinets with a shaker style door frame. I really like the detail on the front of the ones below, and the full overlay door. Love the poster, too!

Diamond Jamestown Cabinets
Diamond Jamestown Cabinets

When we first started browsing at Lowe’s the first time, the Jamestown cabinet through Diamond estimated a total cost of $3,400 for a 10 x 10 kitchen. Since ours is closer to 9×10, and we are pretty limited on the space that we can put the cabinets in due to door ways and window frames, we thought that we would budget in an extra grand and call it a day. Yeah …. I guess we should have added a few extra k’s. Oye. After the Lowes promo, our kitchen was right at $6,200. For just the cabinets.

Lowes Cabinetry Cost
Lowes Cabinetry

I gotta say – this has been a part of the kitchen reno I’ve found rather perplexing. We didn’t add all that many bells or whistles, so it’s kind of a head scratcher to see the price bump up that much. I think the biggest distinction is that the cost estimates given are only for basic cabinetry, and do not include any ad ons or odd sizes. When we were looking through the line items, the biggest bump was the paint! Just over an extra thousand for the white paint cover. Seriously.

Another bump was the crown molding. Just under $1,000 for that, which definitely means that Jay and I have made an executive decision to put that purty little detail up ourselves. We actually came to this conclusion for a few reasons.

First – We want to be able to do crown throughout the entire kitchen, and if we purchased the manufacturers crown for the kitchen cabinets, we might have difficulty matching (we most likely would have difficulty matching…).

Second – Umm, hello cost savings. After pricing it out, it looks like we will be closer to $200 for the entire room vs. $900 for just. the. cabinets. Yep – that help us make the decision, too. :)

Cabinet Crown Molding
Kitchen Crown

Above is an example of the type of trim I am looking for. Lovely lovely love. Here is a look we are going for overall in the kitchen. Hoping we can pull this off with our ensy teensy kitchen.

Kitchen Renovation
Kitchen Renovation

Next up – counter top searching! Looking for an affordable and durable alternative to carrera marble. Along with the rest of the world, right. 😉